Phone Numbers are the Most Personal Form of Identification

Earlier this year, The New York Times published a piece detailing the risks of sharing your phone number online. Many people don’t understand just how much personal information is discoverable with just a phone number. Here is a great quote from the article:

He quickly plugged my cellphone number into a public records directory. Soon, he had a full dossier on me — including my name and birth date, my address, the property taxes I pay and the names of members of my family.

From there, it could have easily gotten worse. Mr. Tezisci could have used that information to try to answer security questions to break into my online accounts. Or he could have targeted my family and me with sophisticated phishing attacks.

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’Because of collisions in names due to the massive number of people online today, a phone number is a stronger identifier.’
— Brian X. Chen, New York Times

By using Archonic numbers where you wouldn’t feel safe or comfortable sharing your personal cell phone number, you can protect yourself from being identified, hacked, or sold as advertising data.

Sam Burk